Lionheart’s New Intern

Lionheart’s New Intern

                    Hello there! I’m Isabel, and I will be a senior at Mercer Island High School this year. I am thrilled to be working at Lionheart for the summer. Since I started, I have learned so much, from website design, to social media marketing. I have been incredibly lucky to work with such a great team. Since I work remotely and the Lionheart team is small, I have been working independently, which allows me to learn things I wouldn’t have if I had been working in a larger company like Microsoft. It all started when I was invited by a friend to go to a startup panel event at Hing Hay Coworks in Chinatown. The event was aimed at showcasing women who started up their own company. I was hoping to meet people and make connections, so I could possibly land an internship in the summer. With college coming up, I wanted a standout internship on my resume. While at the panel, I heard empowering stories that exhibited the strength of women in the tech field; one story stood out to me. This woman turned a tragic event into a powerful mobile application that people could use to help them manage their loved one’s medical conditions. This startup was called Lionheart. After hearing Tammy’s story, I knew I wanted to work there. I introduced myself and 2 months later, I was invited to work for their social media accounts and website. I was absolutely stoked, and I am so thankful that I’ve had the opportunity to work for such an...
Guest Post Friday! “A Few Things I Learned in the NICU”

Guest Post Friday! “A Few Things I Learned in the NICU”

I’ve always liked to write detailed lists. Whether it’s just a to-do list to make my day run more smoothly, or a more significant list, I like order in my life. That’s probably part of the reason why I got a degree in Elementary Education. Teachers are forever making lists and lesson plans, which are really just glorified lists. I always had this perfect plan to have four beautiful children, spaced two years apart. I grew up in a family of three kids; someone always had to ride alone at Disneyland. So, voila! Four kids it would be. Such a scientific and rational approach to the way I decided how many babies I wanted. And of course I would be done having babies by the time I turned 30. I was so excited when my husband and I started trying for a baby. Excitement gave way to nerves, which gave way to sadness, and eventually depression as the months turned into years. I watched as my closest friends and family had first one baby, then two, and three. I shared my struggle with some of them, but no one but my husband really knew the extent of my grief as I soaked my pillow with tears each night. My husband and I are fortunate to live near one of the leading infertility research centers in the world. We spent years and tens of thousands of dollars on invasive testing and procedures. We watched as our friends built their dream homes while we stayed in our tiny town home. We listened and inwardly cringed as they would sort-of jokingly say,...
Our World Was Turned Upside Down

Our World Was Turned Upside Down

My head started spinning as the doctors told me the results of the emergency MRI of my 3-year-old daughter McKenna, that afternoon. And that was when our world turned upside down. McKenna was a very happy little girl. She loved playing with her older brother Jarret and younger sister Kylie. She had always been a very little and petite child. She could eat and eat and never gain a pound! Every morning at 6 AM she would wake up with her Dad before he went into work and have a bowl of soup. The rest of her day consisted of many more snacks and meals. As she would go to the doctor for her regular check-ups I would ask about her small size and low weight. The doctor told me that because my husband (Morgan) and I were not very big people that she would probably not get very big and that we shouldn’t be worried. I tried my best to not worry but still watched her closely. It wasn’t until around 2 months before her 3rd birthday that things started getting bad. McKenna would experience flu-like systems of throwing up and being very tired. The sickness would last a couple of days and then go away. But before you knew it she would be sick again. It turned into a vicious cycle where she just couldn’t get better. Morgan and I thought maybe it was a bad flu bug that she just couldn’t get rid of. So we took her into the doctor and they weighed her in at 24 pounds. This was a very low weight for...
Diagnosis Highlight: FPIES, Food Intolerance — Guest Post

Diagnosis Highlight: FPIES, Food Intolerance — Guest Post

[title size=”2″]Meet Wyatt[/title] Wyatt was born on a beautiful June day, 3 years ago. He has been a fighter from his very first seconds. In the womb, he fought to stay alive and grow. In his first moments of life, he fought to live and to breathe. Wyatt was born without surfactant in his lungs to help them expand and spent some time in the NICU getting help breathing. After a scary week in the hospital, we brought our miracle baby home. From day one, he was a screamer. He screamed all.the.time. You may think that I am exaggerating here, but I can promise you I am not. We rocked him, we swung him, and he spent hours in front of the dryer in a vibrating swing because it was the only thing that helped calm him, even a little bit. I would wear him all day and rock and swing and bounce constantly to help him settle. If I did the dishes, I would put him in the bouncer and bounce with one leg as I did the dishes so that he would just cry, instead of scream, until he passed out. When I tell you that he never slept, I mean never. The doctor told me that he was colicky and to give him gas drops and rub his tummy. He would projectile vomit everything that went into his mouth. I was used to that, because his sister did that too, so I didn’t think anything of it. When he would fall asleep, he was propped on my shoulder in a certain way and he would moan...
Diagnosis Highlight: HPE – Guest Post

Diagnosis Highlight: HPE – Guest Post

Umm… I am sorry, could you spell that for me please? We said this for the first time on November 1st, 2007, about a week and a half after my daughter Dylan was born at just under 31 weeks at a whopping 2 lbs 8 ounces. We were asking the nurse because when we asked the doctor a few days prior he said, “It’s just a big word that’s used to describe a lot of things.” (Yeah, I can’t believe we took that as an answer either, but I am not sure we were ready anyway, a blessing in disguise?) Subsequently, we have been asked to spell ‘it’ approximately a hundred million times. The answer: Holoprosencephaly. Wait! Don’t Google, don’t ever Google…. Not yet anyway. Let me go first. Holoprosencephaly (HPE for short) is a brain malformation where the brain fails to split into four hemispheres. Usually there is no midline separation between hemispheres. It happens within the first weeks of gestation (just as you are finding out you are pregnant) and can be very mild to severe and incompatible with life. There are certain midline facial features associated with it, eyes are closely set, nose not formed properly, cleft lip and pallet. Completely adorable (if I do say so myself…). HPE is often diagnosed in utero; there is an online forum and new mothers come in all the time with so many questions. The main thing you hear the ‘been there done that’ parents say, over and over, is that no two kids with HPE are alike. They all write their own books. The brain is such an incredible organ...