Uh-Oh, a Runner!

Uh-Oh, a Runner!

Friends of mine had a scary moment this summer! Spoiler… but it all worked out in the end. I wanted to share because during this little event, some things went right, and some things went wrong, and some things COULD have gone REALLY wrong. Some friends of mine were at a local amusement park. They have a six-year-old son with Down Syndrome, Spencer who is fun and loves to run… LOVES to run. They had just got done on a fun water ride, twice, Spencer loved it! But they needed to take a little break and went to get something to eat so they went away from the ride and on to the tables by the food carts. The parents who were there together went back and forth ordering, getting situated and picking up a food. And then they realized that Spencer was gone. It was one of those “Well I thought you had him!” and “But I thought you had him!” moments that all parents have had at one… hundred… times. But, being in a crowded place and with Spencer’s diagnosis this made for a very scary situation! Immediately his mom went to the ride that they had just been on that he loved. They had asked around if anyone had seen a boy with down syndrome and while asking people in line some said no and then a few started saying yes! Turns out, he had pushed his way through the entire line. He pushed through, down onto the moving loading platform and onto a raft with another family. The workers and people in law watched it...
Tiny unexpected things to keep tiny hands busy

Tiny unexpected things to keep tiny hands busy

Last week we found an article and posted it through our FaceBook page. An oldie but goodie, it was a brief blog post on what a great autism tool Tic-Tacs can be. As in… a powerful sensory tool that should be at the bottom of every mothers purse! That got us thinking…  what else can we use to keep those tiny hands and brains busy? Oh sure, we can find lists and lists of things to buy for a special prize or toy bag, crayons, peg boards, flash cards. There are a lot of ideas out there and truthfully? They are GREAT, I am even taking some of those ideas on a trip with us. But what not so typical thing can you have in the bottom of your purse or back for your not so typical child? And inexpensive to boot?` This is what we came up with: Masking tape or painters tape – Ever seen a parent tape two of a child’s fingers together? One from each hand? No? Well, then you probably haven’t been next to us at church, I would say it’s not an uncommon occurrence. Masking tape is not sticky enough to hurt when peeled off the skin and it’s not strong enough to leave a mark if it’s taped on something. This makes it the perfect tool to create art wherever you go. Tear a few pieces off for your child and see what they do with it. Stick it, roll it, peel it. Silly Putty – This is a two-for-one. A plastic egg for the first… and squishy happy wonderfulness for the...
Autism Triggers

Autism Triggers

Have a hard time understanding Autism? You aren’t alone. The truth is, I don’t know too much about it, many people don’t. In order to help build acceptance and understanding for different diagnosis we are finding great information and passing it on. Here is a fantastic info graphic found via Pinterest that will help you and I learn what can cause stress in a person with Autism.   To see the graphic in more details please visit the site that created it, feel free to poke around while you are there. Pediatric Occupational Therapy Services, LLC. You can even leave a comment thanking them for spreading awareness and understanding. Image courtesy of imagerymajestic at...
Autism Art

Autism Art

Recently I came across an amazing little artist. Through social media her mom loves to share her art with anyone who will look and listen, which is pretty typical of a mom right? But there is nothing typical about this little budding artist. Candy was diagnosed with Autism when she was three years old. She had been growing and developing just like most children until she started to lose some of the abilities that she had acquired, including talking. Candy is now non-verbal but is able to express herself through amazing paintings that she creates. Autism takes away a person’s ability to communicate in typical ways. People diagnosed with Autism have difficulties in social interactions, verbal and non-verbal interactions and repetitive behavior. But, it turns out, can express themselves in ways that you wouldn’t expect. Candy’s mother has been quoted as saying, “Where words fail, music and art speak.” Now 12, Candy is using her artistic ability to inspire to the world. She is encouraging everyone not to dwell on where someone might have challenges and instead focus on the amazing things they can do. People are picking up paintbrushes where they hadn’t before, and more importantly, parents are handing paint brushes to children they never thought would be interested in, or able to, create art. Candy and her mother have been working hard to spread the word that it’s very important to provide children with Autism with outlets such as art and music, you never know what might connect with them and let them express themselves. There is a news segment that featured Candy and her art work in their...