You’re No Burden, I Assure

You’re No Burden, I Assure

One day running errands with Chloe in her wheelchair and carrying my baby Sam, a very nice lady stopped me to chat about Chloe. She ended by saying, “thank you for carrying such heavy burdens and still being such a happy person.” I know she meant that with all the compassion and empathy in the world and I certainly wasn’t offended, but for Chloe’s sake I wanted to just shout from the rooftops that she is not a burden! These lyrics came to mind: You may need me to carry all your weight, but you’re no burden, I assure. You tide me over with a warmth I’ll not forget and I can only give you love....
What I Can Do

What I Can Do

“What I can do is offer myself, wholehearted and present, to walk with the people I love through the fear and the mess. That’s all any of us can do. That’s what we’re here for.” ~ Shauna...
Ta Da!

Ta Da!

I don’t know a person who isn’t busy. Everyone’s got a to do list a mile long. I’ve attended several workshops on living a life that makes you happy and almost always one of the main points they make is the importance of setting long-term, short-term, and daily goals. I used to use a to do system that looked something like this: So obviously I never actually wrote a to do list like that, but I just had a mental list that was a lot like that and it is pretty comical to think that would ever work. I always knew I had a lot to do, but all that stuff was just jumbled all together and I always felt overwhelmed. So since that wasn’t working and after attending a workshop that reminded and motivated me to live a more purposeful and meaningful life, I got an app that helped me keep track of tasks and goals. That definitely made me more efficient, but after awhile, I started to recognize a trend. Almost every day, things came up and made it so I couldn’t complete everything I had planned. And the majority of the time, the things that came up had to do with being a caregiver to a child with seizures, muscle pain, therapies, IEP’s, sensory issues, medical procedures, medical appointments, etc., etc., etc. If you’re reading this, I’m sure you understand. One day I was feeling discouraged about all I wasn’t doing and my compassionate and wise friend reminded me all that I had accomplished. I realized she was right! I had been focusing on what I wasn’t...
Just Because

Just Because

Sam has recently become obsessed with this book, Just Because by Rebecca Elliott. It’s about a little blonde hair blue eyed boy whose older sister is in a wheelchair. The little boy loves to lay by his sister, laugh with her, look at books with her, be outside with her, pretend with her, and dream with her. The boy doesn’t know why his sister is in a wheelchair and doesn’t talk and has curly hair….just because. Sam makes me read it to him at least 10 times a day. I recently found him sitting on the couch hugging it…..just because. Chloe also loves the book and gets excited when the brother and sister pretend the wheelchair is a rocket and go up into space! Rebecca Elliott has another book about the same siblings and hospital visits the sister has to make, Sometimes. It is also a very sweet book and both of my kids like it a lot. I think these books will become more and more important as Sam matures and understands the many things that make his sister different and can see pictures that look a lot like his life in a fun, happy book. I’m grateful he already understands it enough that reading the books is important and special to him. I can’t recommend these books...
Deciding to Have More Children After Your Special Needs Child

Deciding to Have More Children After Your Special Needs Child

Deciding to have more children is something that weighs very hard on the parents of children with special needs. Can you ever have enough time, will you be able to work with them, can they reach their full potential when you are spread thin? Is it fair to even consider it? Overwhelmingly the answer for people who have continued on to have more children was that they were glad that they had more children. For many reasons. Here are a few: No matter what life brings, your special needs child will never be alone. Not only are we reassured of this as parents but the child knows that everything they do, they will have a sibling beside them to help and encourage them. My children are still young, but I have seen so many examples of protective caring siblings that I can’t wait to see how their relationships will develop. Having a special needs sibling is good for typical children. Many families talk about how their other children are far more patient, quiet and caring for others because of their experience with their special needs sibling. They are often quicker at developing that ability to think outside of their own needs. The extra stimulation is good for children with special needs. Our house is crazy, it’s noisy, there are toys everywhere, kids everywhere. Dylan is always trying to ‘catch’ the other kids, she wants to be where they are and will try as hard as she can to get there. That is motivation that a therapist cannot provide on their own! Logistics work themselves out – One mother asked...