Sibling Troubles? Helpful Tips From Parents!

Sibling Troubles? Helpful Tips From Parents!

We posted a couple weeks ago how you shouldn’t let having a chronically ill or child with special needs hold you back from having more children. Overwhelmingly people who have gone on to have more children are happy that they did and feel like it was the best decision for their family. But, it’s not easy. How do you go about making sure their siblings get as much attention as your more demanding child? It’s easy for mom and dad guilt to creep in, to think that you aren’t doing enough even though you might be. Here are some ideas from the experts, special needs parents. Take them on errands by themselves – Even short trips like the home improvement or grocery store, or even to the gas station, will provide them moments of one on one attention with a parent. It will make them feel special and listened to. Plan a date night (Or a date day!) – A few parents recommended this. Give each sibling a night a month, let them choose what to do, where to go, and have both parents go on the date. Getting away from the distraction of a high needs sibling is crucial to building a relationship – even if it’s only for a few hours a month. Late nights – Have a special night where the sibling gets to stay up a little later and spend time with mom and dad. Remember how cool it was staying up past your bedtime when you were younger? It’s great! And time spent snuggling with mom and dad make it even more special. Find them...
3 Reasons I Don’t Mind When Young Children Point and Stare at My Child With Special Needs

3 Reasons I Don’t Mind When Young Children Point and Stare at My Child With Special Needs

I might be making several generations of special needs parents angry by saying this, but it’s true. I don’t mind when young children point and stare at my child with special needs. In fact, I like it! I’m such a rebel, I know. ‘Don’t point’ and ‘don’t stare’ are pretty basic social recommendations for people of all ages. But let me explain my deviant way of thinking by sharing two examples from the happiest place on earth…you guessed it. Disneyland! Example one. I was waiting with Chloe for the rest of our party to get off a ride that Chloe wasn’t able to go on. We were sitting on a bench and a very cute family was sitting next to us. The mom was passing out snacks and planning their next stop when one of her sons, probably 4 or 5 years old, kept looking at Chloe and/or her wheelchair. His mom noticed and told him it was not nice to stare. Then slowly but surely, he wiggled his way closer and, pointing at Chloe’s pink wheelchair, asked me, “Why is she sitting in that?” I smiled a big grin, excited to talk about how we all have differences and planned to encourage him to chat with Chloe because, well, she loves making friends! Before I got a single word out, his mom went in to panic mode. I’m sure she was thinking, ‘Oh no. He was staring, now he’s pointing and asking questions. He is breaking social protocol. What an embarrassment!’ She grabbed him and angrily told him how it is not nice to point, stare, and annoy strangers....
Tips for Overnight Tubie Feeding

Tips for Overnight Tubie Feeding

I was scrolling through a group on your friendly social media site and I saw what I think is a brilliant way to handle the tube with overnight feedings. A mother was asking how to keep her child safe with overnight feeds because she moved around a lot and mom was worried about the tube strangling her. One mother chimed in with a best practice, string the tube through a pool noodle! then just lay the noodle next to the child in bed. Awesome! Genius! So, starting with that tip, I put together some great tips for over night feeds. The pool noodle. It’s been reported electrical tubing works well as well and it is cheaper and lighter. You can purchase it at home improvement store. Also paper tubing from a paper towel roll. Feeding the bed is inevitable. There are inexpensive vinyl mattress covers (I have included an online link so you know what to look for but Walmart has them for half this cost!) as well as washable pads that will come in handle for quick clean up. Overnight diapers are a must to avoid a diaper change in the middle of the night. You can also use the disposable inserts used in cloth diapers into a regular diaper for added absorption. (Link is one option, but there are several) If you use footie jammies, use the largest button hole setting on a sewing matching to sew a little “reinforced out” for the tube to go through. We do this on the side of Dylan’s jammies. I don’t know how to sew, but I do know how to...
How do you relax?

How do you relax?

The stress! Oh the stress! So much to do, so much to worry about! Through all of this you need to remember to take care of you. If you are not healthy and happy, this negatively impacts your ability to care for your child. What do you do to give yourself a little break? This was recently asked in an online special needs forum and the answers were great! I loved hearing the ideas that people had. Here are a few that I can share. A pedicure – apparently I am the crazy one, I don’t like people touching my feet and messing with them! Not to mention, I fancy myself a runner and I need those callouses where they are! Regardless if I like them or not, they are very popular… So grab yourself an hour and some pretty toes! Moms and dads! A manicure – need some pretty nails to match your new pretty toes? A massage – oooo-k, now we are talking. Now THIS sounds like a good idea! You don’t have to go to an expensive spa, we know that we don’t really have time for that. However, there are a lot of massage therapists set up to work out of their homes as well as massage schools, these places tend to be a bit less expensive. Ask around for a recommendation. Okay okay, having special needs family members is pricey, I get it (believe me) so let’s talk free. (Though, if you can occasionally take a break and can afford it, think about a massage… I will be…) A bubble bath – Quiet time...
Summer Travels with a Special Needs Child

Summer Travels with a Special Needs Child

Finally (already?) summer is here, let the games begin! We can go on road trips! We can go on hikes! We can go on airplanes! But wait… as if planning and packing for your family wasn’t overwhelming enough, the special needs parent has a bit more to consider when planning a trip than the parents of typical children. Sometimes it’s hard to wrap your head around all of the things that you will have to do, but… you deserve a vacation too! You’ve decided to go. You have been thinking about it for months, scouring the TSA website and your airline’s website for information about traveling with a disability and getting medication easily through security. You know to carry your emergency kit and medical information with you (including a letter with your child’s diagnosis) but what are the little things you might not have thought of? We have compiled a helpful list of practical travel tips to help you on your way. [title size=”2″]Practical tips for traveling with a special needs child[/title] Mail diapers and tubie food ahead. These are the heaviest and bulkiest things you plan to bring, but consider sending them to your hotel ahead of time. Hotels will hold on to any packages they receive for you if it’s within a certain time period of your stay. This means you can send a package ahead, make sure it’s arrived and then step on the plane! Use 3M command hooks. When staying away from home, you can use a 3M command hooks to hang your child’s food bag instead of an IV pole. The hooks can go anywhere and...