Be Yourself

Be Yourself

This is the final part of my short series about what I told the nurses during an opportunity to speak at a residency training at our local children’s hospital. Click here for the first part “Love the Parents” and the second “Love the Patient” And the last piece of advise for nurses is to be yourself. When our preemies were in the NICU my husband wanted to be funny and told our nurse that he couldn’t wait until they were out of there and running around and talking back. Easy to say when you are worried about them being able to breath or have sunlight hit their little cheeks! That sharp and very spunky nurse got very close to him and pointed at him and said “Don’t you ever say that!” As a grandma she offered her perspective about how he needed to not rush things because the wonderful times of them being so little will go by too fast. I am sure as a nurse, finding the balance of what to share about yourself with your patients and parents is difficult. And, I can be realistic, you have a lot of patients, remembering who you talked to about what is probably kind of hard to keep straight too. But as parents of babies who were far from talking, it was nice to have some adult interaction and build relationships with our sweet nurses. Keeping our mind off things while charts were being completed and beds were being made was a chance for use to really fall in love with our nurses and who they really are. My some...
Love the Parents

Love the Parents

I volunteered to be on a panel of parents for the Nurse Residency training at our local children’s hospital. It’s a great program, all of the nurses are required to go through an 8 week rotation of all of the different departments so not only do they get familiar with the different areas and can fill-in when needed, but they can also find the area of the hospital that they prefer to work in. On the last day, right before graduation, the instructors have a small group of parents come in, introduce themselves and share some stories about their experiences with nurses. Initially I wasn’t sure what to say but thankfully my husband helped me work through some thoughts and some stories and I think what we put together is worth sharing. It’s general advice to nurses but throughout I include our favorite nurse stories. This will be the first of a couple posts where I share my favorite nurse stories and what we can learn from them. The first thing I asked the nurses to do when it was my turn to talk was to love the parents. I followed with this story. When Dylan was born the Neonatal doctor mention that she most likely had Holoprosencephaly, when we stopped him and asked “what was that word again?” we were told “Oh, it’s just a big word that means lots of things.” (cue gasp from the audience of nurses!) And being the over-whelmed new parents we just accepted that answer. About a week later we got a new nurse in to take care of Dylan in the NICU...