It Starts At School

It Starts At School

Ahhh tis the season… the season for school. What? School? Are we already thinking about school? Yes! In fact, some kids are already back to school and most will be at the end of the month. This is me, over here, embarrassingly doing a little happy dance. My kids need an outlet and giving them the outlet during summer is challenging for me to do on my own! However, I stop the happy dance to get back to reality and the gist of it is that it’s an interesting time of the year for special needs parents as we step right back into many unknown things for our children. We will have to get another IEP going, we will need to meet the new teachers, new paras, new children! I am already more than a little freaked out thinking about sending my kids off to the first year of all day school! This is stressful for parents of typical children but the ante has been upped! A few hours was one thing but we now have to add diaper changes, feedings and naps to Dylan’s school day. One thing that I plan to do this year is take a few minutes to give a special introduction of Dylan in her classroom. I had every intention of doing it last year but honestly? I was a little uncomfortable. (Really? In front of Kindergartners?!) By the time I got to know the kids a little better through volunteering in the classroom, I felt the moment had passed. What a missed opportunity! Knowing what to say when someone asks about our special...
Inclusion in Summer School

Inclusion in Summer School

Okay okay, it’s no secret I love my preschool, but since we have just met, let me give you a bit of background. Dylan and her twin started at our school district preschool right after her third birthday. We didn’t really have a choice on preschools because of her special needs, she transitioned in very easily from our Early Intervention program. I enrolled Duncan there as well, he needed the outlet and this was easy. Even without a choice, boy, did we luck out! We quickly became lifers and since then two additional children have been enrolled there. In the few years that we have been there I have had my preschoolers go into their summer program which is four weeks in the summer, three days a week. I was excited to put my new preschooler in with my second year preschooler to get him used to what going to school will be like. I noticed, as I was walking out the first day, that there was a mom unloading a child in a wheelchair and I remember thinking to myself how happy I was that my kids might have the opportunity to be in a classroom with a special needs child. Well, not my finest hour, because once the wheels got turning it dawned on me that they do the Extended School Year (ESY) program for the special needs kids during the summer. Dylan was in it. So… Of course there would be special need kids in their class! Well, hello… the summer program for typical children was likely a way for the preschool to supplement the ESY...
Examples of Acceptance

Examples of Acceptance

We want you to find this blog full of helpful information and resources. We want you to be able to come to us with questions and comments and have this be a place for you to find new things to share with your friends. Along with that, we want you to come here to fill your heart. Occasionally we will be sharing small stories of acceptance, things that we have seen in our community that warm the heart. Recently a friend of mine posted a picture of her daughter Madelyn diligently working on an end of the school year self-appointed project. Every night her five year old would pull out her big bin of beads and work diligently to make bracelet after bracelet. She declared that she wasn’t going to stop until she had made bracelets for every child in her class. She set off each day with three or four bracelets in her back pack to hand out to her school mates. Adorable right? After a few comments had been made about how thoughtful this was her mom volunteered even more information, and information important to us. There is a child with Down Syndrome in her class and this child has sensory issues. Aware of this, though too young to know exactly why, this sweet girl took special care to only use smooth beads on the bracelet for this classmate “so the bumps wouldn’t bother her when she wore it.” Get out. This story made me want to jump up and down with excitement. To be aware of another child’s special needs and to make special accommodations? Outstanding!...