You’re No Burden, I Assure

You’re No Burden, I Assure

One day running errands with Chloe in her wheelchair and carrying my baby Sam, a very nice lady stopped me to chat about Chloe. She ended by saying, “thank you for carrying such heavy burdens and still being such a happy person.” I know she meant that with all the compassion and empathy in the world and I certainly wasn’t offended, but for Chloe’s sake I wanted to just shout from the rooftops that she is not a burden! These lyrics came to mind: You may need me to carry all your weight, but you’re no burden, I assure. You tide me over with a warmth I’ll not forget and I can only give you love....
What I Can Do

What I Can Do

“What I can do is offer myself, wholehearted and present, to walk with the people I love through the fear and the mess. That’s all any of us can do. That’s what we’re here for.” ~ Shauna...
Adapted Card Holders

Adapted Card Holders

Are you the caregiver for a person with little to no fine motor strength? Just because a person is not able to hold a hand of cards doesn’t mean that person should miss out on playing card games! I love these adapted card holder ideas, mostly because they are simple and truly work great! Trust me, we’ve used them at our house for everything from Old Maid and Go Fish to communication cards and medication reminders. The best part? You probably have all you need to make these work without even making a trip to the store. Images linked to...
Toy Like Me

Toy Like Me

Have you heard of Toy Like Me? It’s a campaign for ran by parents of children with disabilities┬ápromoting change in the toy industry to better represent disabilities. And the toy industry better watch out because if there is a group of people who are patient, persistent, and willing to never stop fighting for what they want, it’s special needs parents! And what a great idea! According to an article on Upworthy, three parents came together and decided their children (one in a wheelchair, one who is deaf and visually impaired, and one who is blind) decided their children needed their assistive accessories to be represented in the toy world to make them feel comfortable and promote positive self image. They made a prototype doll with a cochlear implant, which they shared on social media. The image was shared enough that one week later, a toy company contacted them to take their idea and run with it! There are dolls and a current push for Lego to catch on to the idea. Read the full Upworthy article here. Both of my children, Chloe with special needs and Sam who has no special needs but has a sister with special needs and is exposed to special needs often, love to see pictures of children in wheelchairs in books or toys with special needs equipment (we have a teddy bear with a wheelchair), or when there are children with special needs on one of their favorite shows (Sesame Street does a pretty good job of featuring children with special needs in their episodes). Whenever there is something that reflects those unique aspects...